Eileen


One of the hardest things about tackling bulimia for me has been my fear of bursting the image that my friends and my family have of me as someone who is happy, bubbly, carefree and stable enough to be there for everybody else.  My eating disorder began when I was fifteen, and I didn’t realise it was a pattern until I started throwing up at school.   Everyone thought I was incredibly confident and no-one was fully aware of the deep inferiority I felt at the time.  My relief came in bingeing and purging.

When I was offered help I was not in the mind-set of wanting to get better and found it very easy to lie my way out, and whilst I felt I was superficially through it for a while, it never went away. Three years on I am training at drama school and I have been trying for a year to be a good actor without being a healthy person. I have finally realised, through trying to put my training before anything else, that I cannot put anything in front of my recovery.

I finally sought free help, which is so limited, especially as a full time student. Sweet Cavanagh has been a blessing in giving me all the help they can. Their way of working therapeutically with jewellery is incredibly align with my love of being around beauty.